Phindile Rawulana would have been welcoming her new little bundle of joy into the world.

Instead, she bade him farewell yesterday at a sombre funeral service in Mamelodi East, in Tshwane.


The 28-year-old cannot get to terms with her loss.


She feels the Mamelodi East Clinic could have done more to save her unborn child.

Since she found out that she was pregnant, Phindile said, she had started attending prenatal classes at the clinic.

“I was excited at the prospect of being a mother for the first time and made sure I never missed an appointment,” she said.

According to Phindile, a week ago on Thursday, during her routine check-up, she started feeling pains as if she was in labour.


She informed the nurses, who told her that the baby’s heart was beating slowly.

“I was referred to Mamelodi Day Hospital for the next morning. On arrival I was admitted and a scan was taken. I was

then told my baby boy no longer had a heartbeat.

“My heart is broken. I feel that something could have been done on the same Thursday when the nurses realised the

heart- beat was faint.

“I won’t rest until I get answers,” said Phindile.

She added that her labour was then induced.

“I gave birth to a rotten baby and was told it got rotten in my womb. Why do we have to attend check-ups if in the end

they can’t pick up when there is trouble?” she asked.

Gauteng Department of Health spokesman Steve Mabona said the hospital explained to Phindile what had happened.

“Post-delivery counselling was also offered to help her deal with her loss. We are willing to arrange for a meeting with her

for further explanation,” he said.

Comment with your Facebook